Evidence

Click on the following topics to gain access to a list of relevant resources:

Harvard University Collected References, 2018

Class Psyc E 1609, Prof. Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa

Adult, Aging Brain

Attention

Default Mode Network

Executive Functions

Mind, Brain, Health and Education

Mindfulness & Meditation

Plasticity

Play

Dr. Kim Byrd-Rider’s Reference Picks

Biomechanics Yoga Research

Hospital Staff Programs, 2018

Red resources are recommended by the faculty.

Adult, Aging Brain

Resources

  1. Aalbers, T. (2016). eHealth in the primary prevention of cognitive decline.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.The Brain Aging Monitor Study.
  2. Aalbers, T., Baars, M. A., Rikkert, M. G. O., & Kessels, R. P. (2013). Puzzling with online games (BAM-COG): reliability, validity, and feasibility of an online self-monitor for cognitive performance in aging adults.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of Medical Internet Research15(12).
  3. Abutalebi, J., & Clahsen, H. (2015). Bilingualism, cognition, and aging.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Bilingualism: Language and Cognition18(01), 1-2.
  4. Aimone, J. B., Li, Y., Lee, S. W., Clemenson, G. D., Deng, W., & Gage, F. H. (2014). Regulation and function of adult neurogenesis: from genes to cognition.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Physiological Reviews94(4), 991-1026.
  5. Akbarian, S., Beeri, M. S., & Haroutunian, V. (2013). Epigenetic determinants of healthy and diseased brain aging and cognition.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. JAMA Neurology70(6), 711-718.
  6. Anderson-Hanley, C., Arciero, P. J., Brickman, A. M., Nimon, J. P., Okuma, N., Westen, S. C., … & Zimmerman, E. A. (2012). Exergaming and older adult cognition: a cluster randomized clinical trial.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. American Journal of Preventive medicine42(2), 109-119.
  7. Arai, J.A., Li, S., Hartley, D.M., & Feig, L.A. (2009).  Transgenerational rescue of a genetic defect in long-term potentiation and memory formation by juvenile enrichment(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of Neuroscience, 29(5), 1496-1502.
  8. Ayers, E., & Verghese, J. (2014). Locomotion, cognition and influences of nutrition in aging. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Proceedings of the Nutrition Society73(02), 302-308.
  9. Bavelier, D., Levi, D. M., Li, R. W., Dan, Y., & Hensch, T. K. (2010). Removing brakes on adult brain plasticity: from molecular to behavioral interventions.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. The Journal of Neuroscience30(45), 14964-14971.
  10. Bherer, L., Erickson, K. I., & Liu-Ambrose, T. (2013). A review of the effects of physical activity and exercise on cognitive and brain functions in older adults.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of Aging Research2013.
  11. Boulanger, J. J., & Messier, C. (2014). From precursors to myelinating oligodendrocytes: Contribution of intrinsic and extrinsic factors to white matter plasticity in the adult brain.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Neuroscience269, 343-366.
  12. Burzynska, A. Z., Garrett, D. D., Preuschhof, C., Nagel, I. E., Li, S. C., Bäckman, L., … & Lindenberger, U. (2013). A scaffold for efficiency in the human brain(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.The Journal of Neuroscience33(43), 17150-17159.
  13. Chan, M. Y., Park, D. C., Savalia, N. K., Petersen, S. E., & Wig, G. S. (2014). Decreased segregation of brain systems across the healthy adult lifespan.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences111(46), E4997-E5006.
  14. Chapman, S. B., Aslan, S., Spence, J. S., DeFina, L. F., Keebler, M. W., Didehbani, N., & Lu, H. (2013). Shorter term aerobic exercise improves brain, cognition, and cardiovascular fitness in aging.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience5.
  15. Cozolino, L. (2008). The healthy aging brain : Sustaining attachment, attaining wisdom (1st ed., Norton series on interpersonal neurobiology). New York: W.W. Norton.
  16. Déry, N., Pilgrim, M., Gibala, M., Gillen, J., Wojtowicz, J. M., MacQueen, G., & Becker, S. (2013). Adult hippocampal neurogenesis reduces memory interference in humans: opposing effects of aerobic exercise and depression(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Frontiers in Neuroscience7, 66.
  17. Eyles, D. W., Burne, T. H., & McGrath, J. J. (2013). Vitamin D, effects on brain development, adult brain function and the links between low levels of vitamin D and neuropsychiatric disease(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology34(1), 47-64.
  18. Fagiolini, M., Jensen, C. L., & Champagne, F. A. (2009). Epigenetic influences on brain development and plasticity. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Current Opinion in Neurobiology19(2), 207-212.
  19. Feuerstein, R., & Falik, L. H. (2012). Cognitive enhancement and rehabilitation for the elder population: application of the Feuerstein Instrumental Enrichment Program for the Elderly(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Life Span and Disability15, 21-33.
  20. Fielding, R. A., Gunstad, J., Gustafson, D. R., Heymsfield, S. B., Kral, J. G., Launer, L. J., … & Scarmeas, N. (2013). The paradox of overnutrition in aging and cognition(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences1287(1), 31-43.
  21. Fischer, K. W., Yan, Z., & Stewart, J. (2003).Adult cognitive development: Dynamics in the developmental web (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Handbook of developmental psychology, (pp. 491-516).
  22. Fjell, A. M., Sneve, M. H., Grydeland, H., Storsve, A. B., & Walhovd, K. B. (2016). The disconnected brain and executive function decline in aging(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Cerebral Cortex, bhw082.
  23. Fjell, A. M., Westlye, L. T., Grydeland, H., Amlien, I., Espeseth, T., Reinvang, I., … & Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. (2013). Critical ages in the life course of the adult brain: nonlinear subcortical aging.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Neurobiology of Aging34(10), 2239-2247.
  24. Gazova, I., Laczó, J., Rubinova, E., Mokrisova, I., Hyncicova, E., Andel, R., … & Hort, J. (2013). Spatial navigation in young versus older adults.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience5, 94.
  25. Glass, Brian D., Todd W. Maddox, and Bradley C. Love. (2014). Real-time strategy game training: Emergence of a cognitive flexibility trait.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. PLOS One, 8(8), e70350.
  26. Glisky, E.L. (2007). Changes in cognitive function in human aging.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Ch.1). In Brain aging: Models, methods, and mechanisms. Taylor & Francis.
  27. Gräff, J., Rei, D., Guan, J. S., Wang, W. Y., Seo, J., Hennig, K. M., … & Su, S. C. (2012). An epigenetic blockade of cognitive functions in the neurodegenerating brain.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Nature483(7388), 222-226.
  28. Green, A. E., Kraemer, D. J., DeYoung, C. G., Fossella, J. A., & Gray, J. R. (2012). A gene–brain–cognition pathway: prefrontal activity mediates the effect of COMT on cognitive control and IQ.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Cerebral Cortex, bhs035.
  29. Hillman, C. H., Erickson, K. I., & Kramer, A. F. (2008). Be smart, exercise your heart: exercise effects on brain and cognition.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Nature Reviews Neuroscience9(1), 58-65.
  30. Howard, D. V., Howard Jr, J. H., Japikse, K., DiYanni, C., Thompson, A., & Somberg, R. (2004). Implicit sequence learning: effects of level of structure, adult age, and extended practice.Links to an external site.Psychology and Aging, 19(1), 79.
  31. Katz, S. (2016, July). Gaming the aging brain: Digital cognitive performance in the shadow of dementia.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. In Third ISA Forum of Sociology (July 10-14, 2016). Isaconf.
  32. Knowland, V. C. P., & Thomas, M. S. C. (2014). Educating the adult brain: How the neuroscience of learning can inform educational policy.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.International Review of Education60, 99-122. doi: 10.1007/s11159-014-9412-6
  33. Lee, M. M., Camp, C. J., & Malone, M. L. (2007). Effects of intergenerational Montessori-based activities programming on engagement of nursing home residents with dementia(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Clinical Interventions in Aging2(3), 477.
  34. Lin, L. C., Huang, Y. J., Su, S. G., Watson, R., Tsai, B. W. J., & Wu, S. C. (2010). Using spaced retrieval and Montessori‐based activities in improving eating ability for residents with dementia(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.International journal of geriatric psychiatry25(10), 953-959.
  35. Lövdén, M., Wenger, E., Mårtensson, J., Lindenberger, U., & Bäckman, L. (2013). Structural brain plasticity in adult learning and development. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews37(9), 2296-2310.
  36. Lucassen, P. J., Naninck, E. F., van Goudoever, J. B., Fitzsimons, C., Joels, M., & Korosi, A. (2013). Perinatal programming of adult hippocampal structure and function; emerging roles of stress, nutrition and epigenetics.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Trends in Neurosciences36(11), 621-631.
  37. Luo, L., & Craik, F. I. (2008). Aging and memory: A cognitive approach. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry53(6), 346-353.
  38. Lupien, S. J., McEwen, B. S., Gunnar, M. R., & Heim, C. (2009). Effects of stress throughout the lifespan on the brain, behaviour and cognition. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Nature Reviews Neuroscience10(6), 434-445.
  39. Mareschal, D.Johnson, M. H., Sirois, S., Spratling, M., Thomas, M. S., & Westermann, G. (2007). Neuroconstructivism: How the brain constructs cognition(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Vol. 1). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  40. Menon, V. (2013). Developmental pathways to functional brain networks: emerging principles.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Trends in Cognitive Sciences17(12), 627-640.
  41. Moffat, S. D. (2013). Using gaming platforms to study brain mechanisms of navigation and age-related cognitive decline(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. Digital Games Research Association (DiGRA). Atlanta, GA: Georgia Institute of Technology.
  42. Mueller, A. D., Meerlo, P., McGinty, D., & Mistlberger, R. E. (2013). Sleep and adult neurogenesis: implications for cognit(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.ion and mood (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. In Sleep, neuronal plasticity and brain function (pp. 151-181). Berlin Heidelberg: Springer.
  43. Pesheva, E. (2017). Unravelling the mysteries of aging. Harvard Medical School.
  44. Riddle, D. R., & Schindler, M. K. (2007). Brain aging research.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Reviews in Clinical Gerontology17(04), 225-239.
  45. Samson, R. D., & Barnes, C. A. (2013). Impact of aging brain circuits on cognition.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. European Journal of Neuroscience37(12), 1903-1915.
  46. Spiegel, A. M., Sewal, A. S., & Rapp, P. R. (2014). Epigenetic contributions to cognitive aging: disentangling mindspan and lifespan.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Learning & Memory21(10), 569-574.
  47. Thomas, C., & Baker, C. I. (2013). Teaching an adult brain new tricks: a critical review of evidence for training-dependent structural plasticity in humans.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.NeuroImage73, 225-236.
  48. Torbeyns, J., De Smedt, B., Ghesquière, P., & Verschaffel, L. (2011). Use of indirect addition in adults’s mental subtraction in the number domain up to 1000.British Journal of Psychology, 102, 585-597.
  49. Yaffe, K., Falvey, C. M., & Hoang, T. (2014). Connections between sleep and cognition in older adults.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. The Lancet Neurology13(10), 1017-1028.
  50. Yan, Z., & Fischer, K. (2002). Always under construction.Human Development45(3), 141-160.
  51. Yates, K. F., Sweat, V., Yau, P. L., Turchiano, M. M., & Convit, A. (2012). Impact of metabolic syndrome on cognition and brain a selected review of the literature.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology32(9), 2060-2067.

Attention

Resources

  1. Arnsten, A. F. (2009). Toward a new understanding of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder pathophysiologyCNS drugs23(1), 33-41.
  2. Astle, D. E., & Scerif, G. (2009). Using developmental cognitive neuroscience to study behavioral and attentional control. Developmental Psychobiology51(2), 107-118.doi: 10.1002/dev.20350.
  3. Attention-Deficit, S. O. (2011). ADHD: clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Pediatrics, peds-2011.
  4. Awh, E., Belopolsky, A. V., & Theeuwes, J. (2012). Top-down versus bottom-up attentional control: A failed theoretical dichotomy.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Trends in Cognitive Sciences16(8), 437-443.
  5. Ballarini, F., Martínez, M. C., Perez, M. D., Moncada, D., & Viola, H. (2013). Memory in elementary school children is improved by an unrelated novel experience.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. PloS One8(6), e66875.
  6. Berger, A., Kofman, O., Livneh, U., & Henik, A. (2007). Multidisciplinary perspectives on attention and the development of self-regulation. Progress in Neurobiology, 82(5), 256–286.
  7. Berman, M. G., Jonides, J., & Kaplan, S. (2008). The cognitive benefits of interacting with nature. Psychological Science19(12), 1207-1212.
  8. Chabris, C. & Simons, D. (2010). The invisible gorilla(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..
  9. Chun, M.M., et al. (2011). A taxonomy of external and internal attention.Annual Review of Psychology, 62, 73–101.
  10. de la Cruz, L. F., Simonoff, E., McGough, J. J., Halperin, J. M., Arnold, L. E., & Stringaris, A. (2015). Treatment of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and irritability: results from the multimodal treatment study of children with ADHD (MTA).(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry54(1), 62-70.
  11. Deco, G., & Rolls, E. T. (2005).Attention, short-term memory, and action selection: A unifying theory. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Progress in Neurobiology, 76(4), 236–256.
  12. Deco, G. & Rolls, E.T. (2003). Attention and working memory: a dynamical model of neuronal activity in the prefrontal cortex. European Journal of Neuroscience, 18, 2374-2390.
  13. Dowd, E. W., & Mitroff, S. R. (2013). Attentional guidance by working memory overrides salience cues in visual search.Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance39(6), 1786.
  14. Elliott, E. M., Hughes, R. W., Briganti, A., Joseph, T. N., Marsh, J. E., & Macken, B. (2016). Distraction in verbal short-term memory: Insights from developmental differences. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Journal of Memory and Language88, 39-50.
  15. Fair, D.A., et al. (2013). Distinct neural signatures detected for ADHD subtypes after controlling for micro-movements in resting state functional connectivity MRI data. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, 6(80), 1-31.
  16. Franklin, M. S., Smallwood, J., Zedelius, C. M., Broadway, J. M., & Schooler, J. W. (2016). Unaware yet reliant on attention: Experience sampling reveals that mind-wandering impedes implicit learning.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review23(1), 223-229.
  17. Hodgkins, P., Setyawan, J., Mitra, D., Davis, K., Quintero, J., Fridman, M., … & Harpin, V. (2013). Management of ADHD in children across Europe: patient demographics, physician characteristics and treatment patterns.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. European Journal of Pediatrics172(7), 895-906.
  18. Jacobsen, M.H.S. (2010). Paying attention or fatally distracted? Concentration, memory, and multi-tasking in a multimedia world. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Salem, OR: Willamette University College of Law
  19. Kasparek, T., Theiner, P., & Filova, A. (2013). Neurobiology of ADHD from childhood to adulthood: findings of imaging methods.Journal of Attention Disorders19(11), 931-943.
  20. Klasen, M, et al. (2011).Neural contributions to flow experience during video game playing. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Scan. doi:10.1093/scan/nsr021
  21. Kristjánsson, Á., Saevarsson, S., & Driver, J. (2013). The boundary conditions of priming of visual search: From passive viewing through task-relevant working memory load.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review20(3), 514-521.
  22. Lagroix, H. E., Di Lollo, V., & Spalek, T. M. (2015). Is pop-out visual search attentive or preattentive? Yes!.  Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance41(2), 556.
  23. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Mather, E. (2013). Novelty, attention, and challenges for developmental psychology. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Frontiers in Psychology. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00491
  24. Mattfeld, A. T., Gabrieli, J. D., Biederman, J., Spencer, T., Brown, A., Kotte, A., … & Whitfield-Gabrieli, S. (2014). Brain differences between persistent and remitted attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Brain137(9), 2423-2428.
  25. McCann, D., et al. (2007). Food additives and hyperactive behaviour in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial.Lancet 2007; 370: 1560–67.
  26. McClelland, M. M., Acock, A. C., Piccinin, A., Rhea, S. A., & Stallings, M. C. (2013). Relations between preschool attention span-persistence and age 25 educational outcomes(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 28(2), 314-324.
  27. Miller, E. K., & Buschman, T. J. (2013). Cortical circuits for the control of attention.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Current Opinion in Neurobiology23(2), 216-222.
  28. Moore, C. M., & Egeth H. (1997). Perception without attention: Evidence of grouping under conditions of inattention.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 23, 339–352.
  29. Morey, C. C., & Bieler, M. (2013). Visual short-term memory always requires general attention(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Psychonomic Bulletin & Review20(1), 163-170.
  30. Mundy, P., & Newell, L. (2007). Attention, joint attention, and social cognition.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 16(5), 269–274.
  31. Murphy, J. M., McCarthy, A. E., Baer, L., Zima, B. T., & Jellinek, M. S. (2014). Alternative national guidelines for treating attention and depression problems in children: comparison of treatment approaches and prescribing rates in the United Kingdom and United States. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Harvard Review of Psychiatry22(3), 179-192.
  32. National Institutes of Mental Health. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  33. Nigg, J. T., Elmore, A. L., Natarajan, N., Friderici, K. H., & Nikolas, M. A. (2015). Variation in an iron metabolism gene moderates the association between blood lead levels and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in childrenPsychological Science27(2), 257-269.
  34. Nigg, J. T., & Holton, K. (2014). Restriction and elimination diets in ADHD treatment.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Child and adolescent psychiatric clinics of North America23(4), 937-953.
  35. (2013). Ritalin prescribing information.
  36. Oberwelland, E., Schilbach, L., Barisic, I., Krall, S. C., Vogeley, K., Fink, G. R., et al. (2016). Look into my eyes: Investigating joint attention using interactive eye-tracking and fMRI in a developmental sample. NeuroImage130, 248-260.
  37. Owens, J. A. (2009). A clinical overview of sleep and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry18(2).
  38. Packard, R.G. (1970). The control of “classroom attention”: a group contingency for complex behavior.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of Applied Behavior,  3(1), 13-28.
  39. Perera, H., Jeewandara, K. C., Seneviratne, S., & Guruge, C. (2012). Combined ω3 and ω6 supplementation in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) refractory to methylphenidate treatment a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of Child Neurology27(6), 747-753.
  40. Pessoa, L., et al. (2002). Neural processing of emotional faces requires attention. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.PNAS, 99(17), 11458-11463.
  41. Petersen, S. E., & Posner, M. I. (2012). The attention system of the human brain: 20 years after. Annual Review of Neuroscience35, 73.
  42. Petersen, S. E., & Posner, M. I. (2012). The attention system of the human brain: 20 years after.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Annual Review of Neuroscience35, 73.
  43. Posner, M. (2009). Michael Posner on the anatomy of attentional networks – a historical perspective. [video(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.] (19:49). goCognitive. Available at https://vimeo.com/5280169
  44. Posner, M. I. (Ed.). (2011). Cognitive neuroscience of attention. Guilford Press.
  45. Posner, M. I., & Rothbart, M. K. (2000). Developing mechanisms of self-regulation.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Development and psychopathology12(03), 427-441.
  46. Posner, M. I., & Rothbart, M. K. (2007). Research on attention networks as a model for the integration of psychological science. Annual Review of Psychology,58, 1-23.
  47. Posner, M.I., & Rothbart, M.K. (2009). Toward a physical basis of attention and self regulation.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Physics of Life Reviews, 6(2), 103-120.
  48. Posner, M.I., Rothbart, M.K., & Rueda, M.R. (2014). Developing attention and self regulation in childhood. In K. Nobre & S. Kastner (eds.). Handbook of attention(pp.541-569). London: Oxford University Press.
  49. Posner, M. I., Rothbart, M. K., & Tang, Y. Y. (2015). Enhancing attention through training.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences4, 1-5.
  50. Posner, M. I., Rothbart, M. K., Sheese, B. E., & Voelker, P. (2014). Developing attention: Behavioral and brain mechanisms.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Advances in Neuroscience.
  51. Posner, M.I., Rothbart, M.K., Sheese, B.E., & Voelker, P. (2012). Control networks and neuromodulators of early development.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Developmental Psychology, 48(3), 827-835 DOI:10.1037/a0025530.
  52. Posner, M. I., Rueda, M. R., & Kanske, P. (2007). Probing the mechanisms of attention.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Handbook of Psychophysiology, 410.
  53. Purper-Ouakil, D., Ramoz, N., Lepagnol-Bestel, A. M., Gorwood, P., & Simonneau, M. (2011). Neurobiology of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Pediatric Research69(5), 487-496.
  54. Ravizza, S.M. & Ivry, R.B. (2001). Comparison of the basal ganglia and cerebellum in shifting attention.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 13(3), 285–297.
  55. Raz, A. & Buhl, J. (2006). T(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.ypologies of attentional networks. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Nature Reviews Neuroscience,7(5), 367-379.
  56. Rolls, E.T., et al. (2008). Selective attention to affective value alters how the brain processes olfactory stimuli. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 20(10), 1815–1826.
  57. Romero, P., & Calvillo-Gámez, E. (2012, September). Effortless attention and composite challenges in movement interaction.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. In Proceedings of the 26th Annual BCS Interaction Specialist Group Conference on People and Computers (pp. 157-164). British Computer Society.
  58. Rosen, C. (2008). The myth of multitasking.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. The New Atlantis, 20, 105–110.
  59. Rosenberg, M. D., Finn, E. S., Scheinost, D., Constable, R. T., & Chun, M. M. (2017). Characterizing attention with predictive network models.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Trends in Cognitive Sciences21(4), 290-302.
  60. Rubia, K. R. (2018). Cognitive Neuroscience of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and its clinical translation. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Frontiers in Human Neuroscience12, 100.
  61. Rueda, M. R., Posner, M. I., & Rothbart, M. K. (2004). Attentional control and self-regulation.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Handbook of self-regulation: Research, theory, and applications2, 284-299. Chicago.
  62. Rueda, M. R., Posner, M. I., & Rothbart, M. K. (2005). The development of executive attention: Contributions to the emergence of self-regulation. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Developmental Neuropsychology28(2), 573-594.
  63. Rueda, M. R., Rothbart, M. K., McCandliss, B. D., Saccomanno, L., & Posner, M. I. (2005). Training, maturation, and genetic influences on the development of executive attention.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America102(41), 14931-14936.
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  65. Rueda, M.R., Fan, J., Halparin, J., Gruber, D., Lercari, L.P., McCandliss B.D., & Posner, M.I. (2004). Development of attention during childhood.Neuropsychologia, 42(8)1029-1040.
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  68. Shannon, B. J., Raichle, M. E., Snyder, A. Z., Fair, D. A., Mills, K. L., Zhang, D., … & Stevens, A. A. (2011). Premotor functional connectivity predicts impulsivity in juvenile offenders. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences108(27), 11241-11245.
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  70. Shaw, P., et al. (2007). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is characterized by a delay in cortical maturationPNAS,104(49), 19649–19654.
  71. Sheese, B. E., Voelker, P, Posner, M. I., & Rothbart, M. K. (2009). Genetic variation influences on the early development of reactive emotions and their regulation by attentionCognitive Neuropsychiatry14(4-5), 332- 355.
  72. Simmons, D.J. & Chabris, C.F. (1990) Gorillas in our midst: sustained inattentional blindness for dynamic events.Perception, 28, 1059-1074.
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  76. Sylvester, C. M., Corbetta, M., Raichle, M. E., Rodebaugh, T. L., Schlaggar, B. L., Sheline, Y. I., … & Lenze, E. J. (2012). Functional network dysfunction in anxiety and anxiety disorders. Trends in Neurosciences35(9), 527-535.
  77. Swann, C., Keegan, R., et. al. (2012). A systematic review of the experience, occurrence, and controllability of flow in states in elite sport.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Psychology of Sport and Exercise13, 807-819.
  78. Swan, C., et al. (2012). A systematic review of the experience, occurrence, and controllability of flow states in elite sport.Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 13, 807-819.
  79. Tang, Y. Y., Posner, M. I., & Rothbart, M. K. (2014). Meditation improves self‐regulation over the life span.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences1307(1), 104-111.
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  81. Thomson, D. R., & Milliken, B. (2013). Contextual distinctiveness produces long-lasting priming of pop-out. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance39(1), 202.Tokuhama-Espinosa, T. (2014). Making classrooms better: Best practices 1-5 (attention and memory) [video (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.] (12:20 minutes).
  82. Tokuhama-Espinosa, T. (2014). Making classrooms better: Best practices11-16 (attention; affect) [video (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.] (19:44; 33:58 minutes).
  83. Treisman, A. (1986). Features and objects in visual processing.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Scientific American255(5), 114-125.
  84. Voelker, P., Rothbart, M. K., & Posner, M. I. (2016). A polymorphism related to methylation influences attention during performance of speeded skills.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.AIMS Neuroscience3(1), 40-55.
  85. Voelker, P., Sheese, B. E., Rothbart, M. K., & Posner, M. I. (2016). Methylation polymorphism influences practice effects in children during attention tasks.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Cognitive Neuroscience, 1-13.
  86. Vogel, A. C., Miezin, F. M., Petersen, S. E., & Schlaggar, B. L. (2011). The putative visual word form area is functionally connected to the dorsal attention network.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Cerebral cortex22(3), 537-549.
  87. Volkman, J. (2014). Flow: Effortless and complete attention(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..(16:55 mins). Harvard University (PSYCE-1609).
  88. Volkman, J. (2016). Week 11: Attention. [slides]. Harvard University (PSYCE-1609).
  89. Vuilleumier, P. (2005). How brains beware: neural mechanisms of emotional attention. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Trends in Cognitive Sciences9(12), 585-594.
  90. Willcutt, E. G., Doyle A. E., Nigg, J. T., Faraone, S. V., & Pennington, B. F. (2005). Validity of the executive function theory of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A meta-analytic review(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Biological Psychiatry, 57(11), 1336–1346.
  91. Wilson, K. & Korn, J.H. (2007). Attention during lectures: Beyond ten minutes.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Teaching of Psychology, 34(2), 85-89.
  92. Wu, F., & Huberman, B. A. (2007). Novelty and collective attention.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences104(45), 17599-17601.
  93. Xia, S., Foxe, J. J., Sroubek, A. E., Branch, C., & Li, X. (2014). Topological organization of the “small-world” visual attention network in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience8.
  94. Zajonc, R. B. (1968). Attitudinal effects of mere exposure.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology9(2), 1-27.
  95. Zima, B. T., Bussing, R., Tang, L., Zhang, L., Ettner, S., Belin, T. R., & Wells, K. B. (2010). Quality of care for childhood attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in a managed care Medicaid program.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry49(12), 1225.
  96. ADD & ADHD Mental Health and Schools, Strategies. From University of Nevada website, downloaded 5 October 2018

Default Mode Network

Resources

  1. Abbas, K., Shenk, T. E., Poole, V. N., Breedlove, E. L., Leverenz, L. J., Nauman, E. A., … & Robinson, M. E. (2015). Alteration of default mode network in high school football athletes due to repetitive subconcussive mild traumatic brain injury: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Brain Connectivity5(2), 91-101.
  2. Baliki, M. N., Geha, P. Y., Apkarian, A. V., & Chialvo, D. R. (2008). Beyond feeling: chronic pain hurts the brain, disrupting the default-mode network dynamics.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. The Journal of Neuroscience28(6), 1398-1403.
  3. Brewer, J.A., et al. (2012). Meditation experience is associated with differences in default mode network activity and connectivity.PNAS, 108(50), 20254–20259.
  4. Buckner, R. L., & Vincent, J. L. (2007). Unrest at rest: default activity and spontaneous network correlations.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Neuroimage37(4), 1091-1096.
  5. Callard, F., Smallwood, J., & Margulies, D. S. (2012). Default positions: how neuroscience’s historical legacy has hampered investigation of the resting mind. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Frontiers in Psychology3, 321.
  6. Fox, M. D., & Raichle, M. E. (2007). Spontaneous fluctuations in brain activity observed with functional magnetic resonance imaging. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Nature Reviews Neuroscience8(9), 700-711.
  7. Greicius, M. D., Krasnow, B., Reiss, A. L., & Menon, V. (2003). Functional connectivity in the resting brain: a network analysis of the default mode hypothesis.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences100(1), 253-258.
  8. Greicius, M. D., Srivastava, G., Reiss, A. L., & Menon, V. (2004). Default-mode network activity distinguishes Alzheimer’s disease from healthy aging: evidence from functional MRI(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America101(13), 4637-4642.
  9. Greicius, M. D., Supekar, K., Menon, V., & Dougherty, R. F. (2009). Resting-state functional connectivity reflects structural connectivity in the default mode network(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Cerebral Cortex19(1), 72-78.
  10. Guerra-Carrillo, B., Mackey, A. P., & Bunge, S. A. (2014). Resting-state fMRI A window into human brain plasticity.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. The Neuroscientist20(5), 522-533.
  11. Gusnard, D.A., Akbudak, E., Shulman, G.L., & Raichle ME. (2001). Medial prefrontal cortex and self-referential brain activity: relation to a default mode of brain function.Proc Natl Acad Sci, 98(7):4259-4264.
  12. Hamilton, J. P., Farmer, M., Fogelman, P., & Gotlib, I. H. (2015). Depressive rumination, the default-mode network, and the dark matter of clinical neuroscience(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Biological Psychiatry78(4), 224-230.
  13. Hasenkamp, W., & Barsalou, L.W. (2012). Effects of meditation experience on functional connectivity of distributed brain networks. Frontiers of Human Neuroscience, 6(38), 1-14.
  14. Ho, T. C., Connolly, C. G., Blom, E. H., LeWinn, K. Z., Strigo, I. A., Paulus, M. P., … & Tapert, S. F. (2015). Emotion-dependent functional connectivity of the default mode network in adolescent depression(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Biological psychiatry78(9), 635-646.
  15. Horn, A. (2014). The structural-functional Connectome: Default Mode Network (DTI) connectivity.. (0:45 minutes). Available on: The Structural-Functional Connectome: Default Mode Network (DTI) Connectivity (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  16. Immordino-Yang, M.H., Christodoulou, J., & Singh, V. (2012). Rest is not idleness: Implications of the brain’s default mode for human development and education. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7(4), 352-364. Immordino-Yang, M.H., et al. (2012).
  17. Joshi, G., Arnold Anteraper, S., Patil, K. R., Semwal, M., Goldin, R. L., Furtak, S. L., … & Whitfield-Gabrieli, S. (2017). Integration and Segregation of Default Mode Network Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Transition-Age Males with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Proof-of-Concept Study(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Brain connectivity7(9), 558-573.
  18. Kalbfleisch, M.L. (2011 August). The neurobiology of constructivism: The role of story and the science of imagination.Hillfield Strathallan College, Hamilton, Ontario Canada: Brain Learning and Applications Institute.
  19. Kalbfleisch, M.L. (2011 January).  The science of imagination. [Conference]. Falls Church, VA: Creative Cauldron.
  20. Kennedy, D.P., et al. (2006). Failing to deactivate: Resting functional abnormalities in autism.PNAS, 103(21), 8275–8280.
  21. Leech, R., Kamourieh, S., Beckmann, C. F., & Sharp, D. J. (2011). Fractionating the default mode network: distinct contributions of the ventral and dorsal posterior cingulate cortex to cognitive control.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. The Journal of Neuroscience31(9), 3217-3224.
  22. Lui, S., Huang, X., Chen, L., Tang, H., Zhang, T., Li, X., … & Sweeney, J. A. (2009). High-field MRI reveals an acute impact on brain function in survivors of the magnitude 8.0 earthquake in China(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences106(36), 15412-15417.
  23. Mazoyer, B., et al (2009). Regional cerebral blood flow increases during wakeful rest following cognitive training.Brain Research Bulletin80, 133–138.
  24. Mitra, A., Snyder, A. Z., Hacker, C. D., & Raichle, M. E. (2014). Lag structure in resting-state fMRI.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of Neurophysiology111(11), 2374-2391.
  25. Qin, P., & Northoff, G. (2011). How is our self related to midline regions and the default-mode network?(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Neuroimage57(3), 1221-1233.
  26. Raichle, M. E. (2010). The brain’s dark energy.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Scientific American302(3), 44-49.
  27. Raichle, M. E. (2010). Two views of brain function.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Trends in Cognitive Sciences14(4), 180-190.
  28. Raichle, M.E. (2010). Interview: Marcus Raichle on the ‘default mode network’.. (6:31 minutes). Available on: Marcus Raichle on the ‘default mode network'(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  29. Raichle, M. E. (2011). The restless brain.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Brain Connectivity1(1), 3-12.
  30. Raichle, M. E. (2015). The brain’s default mode network(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Annual review of neuroscience38, 433-447.
  31. Raichle, M. E. (2015). The restless brain: how intrinsic activity organizes brain function. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society Biological Sciences370(1668), 20140172.
  32. Raichle, M. E., & Snyder, A. Z. (2007). A default mode of brain function: a brief history of an evolving idea.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Neuroimage37(4), 1083-1090.
  33. Rojas Costa, G. (2014). Default mode network. Standard functional connectivity network created using 45 volunteers.. (0:42 minutes). Available on: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkjlL9cMUB8(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  34. Sambataro, F., Murty, V. P., Callicott, J. H., Tan, H. Y., Das, S., Weinberger, D. R., & Mattay, V. S. (2010). Age-related alterations in default mode network: impact on working memory performance(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Neurobiology of Aging31(5), 839-852.
  35. Shannon, B. J., Raichle, M. E., Snyder, A. Z., Fair, D. A., Mills, K. L., Zhang, D., … & Stevens, A. A. (2011). Premotor functional connectivity predicts impulsivity in juvenile offenders. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences108(27), 11241-11245.
  36. Sheline, Y. I., Barch, D. M., Price, J. L., Rundle, M. M., Vaishnavi, S. N., Snyder, A. Z., … & Raichle, M. E. (2009). The default mode network and self-referential processes in depression(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences106(6), 1942-1947.
  37. Spreng, R. N., & Grady, C. L. (2010). Patterns of brain activity supporting autobiographical memory, prospection, and theory of mind, and their relationship to the default mode network(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience,22(6), 1112-1123.
  38. Supekar, K., Uddin, L. Q., Prater, K., Amin, H., Greicius, M. D., & Menon, V. (2010). Development of functional and structural connectivity within the default mode network in young children(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Neuroimage52(1), 290-301.
  39. Sylvester, C.M., et al. (2012). Functional network dysfunction in anxiety and anxiety disordersTrends in Neurosciences, 35(9), 527-535.
  40. Taylor, V.A., et al. (2012).Impact of meditation training on the default mode network during a restful state.  doi:10.1093/scan/nsr087
  41. Tomasi, D. & Volkow, N.D. (2012). Abnormal functional connectivity in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder,Biological Psychiatry, 71, 443–450.
  42. Uddin, L. Q., Clare Kelly, A. M., Biswal, B. B., Xavier Castellanos, F., & Milham, M. P. (2009). Functional connectivity of default mode network components: correlation, anticorrelation, and causality(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Human Brain Mapping30(2), 625-637.
  43. Uddin, L.Q., et al. (2008). Network homogeneity reveals decreased integrity of default-mode network in ADHD.Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 169, 249–254.
  44. Utevsky, A. V., Smith, D. V., & Huettel, S. A. (2014). Precuneus is a functional core of the default-mode network(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Journal of Neuroscience34(3), 932-940.
  45. Volkman, J. (2014). The default mode network. [slides]. Harvard University (PSYCE-1609).
  46. Ward, A. M., Mormino, E. C., Huijbers, W., Schultz, A. P., Hedden, T., & Sperling, R. A. (2015).Relationships between default-mode network connectivity, medial temporal lobe structure, and age-related memory deficits (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Neurobiology of Aging36(1), 265-272.
  47. Washington, S.D., Gordon, E.M., Brar, J., Girton, L., Hailu, A., Wolfe, A., Warburton, S., Mbwana, J., Kenworthy, L., Gaillard, W.D., Kalbfleisch, M.L., & Van Meter, J.W. (2013). Dysmaturation of functional connectivity in the default mode networks of autistic individuals. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Human Brain Mapping. doi: 10.1002/hbm.22252
  48. Whitfield-Gabrieli, S. & Ford, J.M. (2012). Default Mode Network activity and connectivity in psychopathology.Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 8, 49–76.
  49. Whitfield-Gabrieli, S., Bauer, C., Okano, K., Nestor, P., Del Re, E., Gosh, S., & Niznikiewicz, M. (2017). M64. Real Time fmri Feedback Targeting Default Mode Network (dmn) Reduces Auditory Hallucinations. Schizophrenia Bulletin43(suppl_1), S233.
  50. Yang, X., Bossman, J., Schiffhauer, B., Jordan, M., & Immordino-Yang, M.H. (2013). Intrinsic default mode network connectivity predicts spontaneous verbal descriptions of autobiographical memories during social processing.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Frontiers in Cognitive Science, 3, 592. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00592.
  51. Zalesky, A., Fornito, A., Cocchi, L., Gollo, L. L., & Breakspear, M. (2014). Time-resolved resting-state brain networks.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences111(28), 10341-10346.

Executive Functions

Resources

  1. Anderson, P. (2002). Assessment and development of executive function (EF) during childhood(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Child Neuropsychology, 8(2), 71–82.
  2. Baggetta, P., & Alexander, P. A. (2016).Conceptualization and operationalization of executive function. Mind, Brain, and Education10(1), 10-33.
  3. Barkley, R. A. (2012). Executive functions: What they are, how the work, and why they evolved(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
  4. Barker, J. E., Semenov, A. D., Michaelson, L., Provan, L. S., Snyder, H. R., & Munakata, Y. (2014). Less-structured time in children’s daily lives predicts self-directed executive functioning.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Frontiers in Psychology5.
  5. Barnett, W. S., Jung, K., Yarosz, D. J., Thomas, J., Hornbeck, A., Stechuk, R., & Burns, S. (2008). Educational effects of the Tools of the Mind curriculum: A randomized trial.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Early Childhood Research Quarterly23(3), 299-313.
  6. Baum, G. L., Ciric, R., Roalf, D. R., Betzel, R. F., Moore, T. M., Shinohara, R. T., … & Ruparel, K. (2016). Modular segregation of structural brain networks supports the development of executive function in youth.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. arXiv preprint arXiv:1608.03619.
  7. Best, J. R., & Miller, P. H. (2010). A developmental perspective on executive function(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. Child Development, 81(6), 1641–1660.
  8. Best, J. R., Miller, P. H., & Naglieri, J. A. (2011). Relations between executive function and academic achievement from ages 5 to 17 in a large, representative national sample(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Learning and Individual Difference, 21(4), 327–336.
  9. Bialystok, E. (2015). Bilingualism and the development of executive function: the role of attention.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Child Development Perspectives9(2), 117-121.
  10. Blakemore, S. J., & Choudhury, S. (2006). Development of the adolescent brain: implications for executive function and social cognition.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry47(3‐4), 296-312.
  11. Bodrova, E., & Deborah J.. Leong. (2007). Tools of the mind(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. Retrieved 24 Oct 2016 from http://www.bostonchildrensmuseum.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/5-Tools-of-the-Mind-Curriculum.pdf
  12. Brock, L. L., Rimm-Kaufman, S. E., Nathanson, L., & Grimm, K. J. (2009). The contributions of ‘hot’ and ‘cool’ executive function to children’s academic achievement, learning-related behaviors, and engagement in kindergarten(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Early Childhood Research Quarterly24(3), 337-349.
  13. Burgess, P. W., Alderman, N., Evans, J., Emslie, H., & Wilson, B. A. (1998). The ecological validity of tests of executive function.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society4(06), 547-558.
  14. Carlson, S. M., Claxton, L. J., & Moses, L. J. (2015). The relation between executive function and theory of mind is more than skin deep.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of Cognition and Development16(1), 186-197.
  15. Carlson, S. M., Moses, L. J., & Breton, C. (2002). How specific is the relation between executive function and theory of mind? Contributions of inhibitory control and working memory(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. Infant and Child Development, 11(2), 73–92.
  16. Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. (2014). Activities guide: Enhancing and practicing executive function skills with children from infancy to adolescence. Cambridge, MA: Author.
  17. Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. (2014). Enhancing and practicing executive function skills with children from infancy to adolescence.Available at http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu
  18. Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. (2012). In brief, Executive function: Skills for life and learning.(5:35). Available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efCq_vHUMqs (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  19. Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. (2011). Building the brain’s “air traffic control” system: How early experiences shape the development of executive function: Working Paper No. 11.
  20. Connelly, J., & Ozonoff, S. (2016). Contrasting the executive function and medial temporal hypotheses of autism. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Undergraduate Research Abstracts Journal1.
  21. Cooper-Kahn, J., & Dietzel, L. (2008). Late, lost, and unprepared: A parents’ guide to helping children with executive functioning(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. Bethesda, MD: Woodbine House.
  22. Daly, M., McMinn, D., & Allan, J. L. (2015). A bidirectional relationship between physical activity and executive function in older adults.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience8, 1044.
  23. Dawson, P., & Guare, R. (2010). Executive skills in children and adolescents: A practice guide to assessment and intervention(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Guilford Press.
  24. Diamond, A. (2011) Why tools of the mind and Montessori educational approaches can help executive function skills. Virginia
  25. Diamond, A. (2012). Activities and programs that improve children’s executive functions.Current Directions in Psychological Science21(5), 335-341.Tech Carilion Research Institute   (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  26. Diamond, A. (2012). Understanding executive functions.. (49:41 minutes). Available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWBn9LOHjzA    (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  27. Diamond, A. (2013). Executive functions.Annual Review of Psychology, 64,135–68
  28. Diamond, A. (2013). Executive functions: What will it likely take to be successful in the 21st century?. Harvard University (PSYCE-1609).
  29. Diamond, A. (2013). Executive functions: What will it likely take to be successful in the 21st century?.[slides]. Harvard University (PSCYE-1609).
  30. Diamond, A. (2013). Development of executive functions.(38:15). Available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pd8YO6sveS4  Links to an external site.
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Other Resources

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Mindfulness & Meditation

Resources

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  75. Tang, Y.Y., et al. (2007). Short-term meditation training improves attention and self-regulation. PNAS, 104(43), 17152-17156.
  76. Tang, Y.Y., Tang, R., Jiang, C. & Posner, M.I. (2014).Short-term meditation intervention improves self-regulation and academic performance. Journal of Child and Adolescent Behavior2, 4.
  77. Tang, Y. Y., Lu, Q., Geng, X., Stein, E. A., Yang, Y., & Posner, M. I. (2010). Short-term meditation induces white matter changes in the anterior cingulate.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences107(35), 15649-15652.
  78. Taylor, V.A., et al. (2012).Impact of meditation training on the default mode network during a restful state.  doi:10.1093/scan/nsr087
  79. Tei, S., Faber, P. L., Lehmann, D., Tsujiuchi, T., Kumano, H., Pascual-Marqui, R. D., et al. (2009).Meditators and non-meditators: EEG source imaging during resting. Brain Topography22(3), 158-165.
  80. Teper, R., & Inzlicht, M. (2013). Meditation, mindfulness and executive control:the importance of emotional acceptance and brain based performance monitoring. Scan, 8, 85-92.
  81. Thompson, M., & Gauntlett-Gilbert, J. (2008).Mindfulness with children and adolescents: Effective clinical application. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 13(3), 395-407.
  82. Vestergard-Poulson, P., van Beek, M., Skewes, J., Bjarkam, C.B., et al. (2009). Long-term meditation is associated with increased gray matter density in the brain stem. Neuroreport, 20(2), 171-174.
  83. Volkman, J. (2014). Mindfulness as therapy: The science behind the practice(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. [video (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.]. Harvard University (PSYCE-1609).Click to view undefined
  84. Walker, S. D. (2017). The Effects of Mindfulness Training on Teacher Perception of Stress and Teacher Self-Efficacy(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Doctoral dissertation, Baker University).
  85. Waters, L., Barsky, A., Ridd, A., & Allen, K. (2014). Contemplative education: A systematic, evidence-based review of the effect of meditation interventions in schools. Educational Psychology Review,http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10648-014-9258-2.
  86. Weng, H. Y., Fox, A. S., Shackman, A. J., Stodola, D. E., Caldwell, J. Z., Olson, M. C., … & Davidson, R. J. (2013). Compassion training alters altruism and neural responses to suffering.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Psychological Science24(7), 1171-1180.

Other Resources

  1. Burnett, R. (2013 February 14). Mindfulness in schools.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. (19:22).
  2. Cheung, L., & Hanh, T. N. (2010). Savor: Mindful eating, mindful life(p. 304). Chicago, IL: HarperOne.
  3. Cromie, W.J. (2006). Meditation found to increase brain size: Mental calisthenics bulk up some layers. Harvard Gazette.
  4. Dunoon, D., & Langer, E. J. (2011).Mindfulness and leadership: Opening up to possibilities. Integral Leadership Review, 11(5), 1-15.
  5. Feinberg, C. (2010). The mindfulness chronicles on “the psychology of possibility”(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Harvard Magazine.
  6. Grierson, B. (2014). What if age is nothing but a mind-set(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.The New York Times Magazine’s Health Issue.
  7. Killingsworth, M. (2011). Want to be happier? Stay in the moment.(10:15). Available at https://www.ted.com/talks/matt_killingsworth_want_to_be_happier_stay_in_the_moment (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  8. Langer, E. (2013). Mindfulness over matter. PopTech.(22:20). Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XQUJR4uIGM. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  9. McGreevy, S. (2012). Meditation’s positive residual effects.Harvard Magazine.
  10. Puddicombe, A. (2012). All it takes is 10 mindful minutes.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Ted Talk. [video (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.]. (9:24 minutes).
  11. Purser, R., & Loy, D. (2013). Beyond McMindfulness(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Huffington Post1(7), 13.
  12. Shafer, L. & Rastegari, I. (2016). The biology of positive habits: Your brain may be hard-wired to focus on the negative but (with practice) you can rewire it.Harvard Graduate School of Education: Usable Knowledge.
  13. Stern, T. (2015). Mindful learning(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.New Vistas, 1(1), 16-19. Chicago
  14. Vaughan-Lee, E. (2014). Path of freedom; In the tough guy world of an American prison, a former inmate returns to teach mindfulness meditation.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Go Project Films.. (10:00).
  15. Volkman, J. (2012). Meditation instruction by a 7-year-old.
    (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

Motivation

Resources

  1. Bahlmann, J., Aarts, E., & D’Esposito, M. (2015). Influence of motivation on control hierarchy in the human frontal cortex.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. The Journal of Neuroscience35(7), 3207-3217.
  2. Baldassarre, G., & Mirolli, M. (2013). Intrinsically motivated learning systems: an overview(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (pp. 1-14). Germany: Springer.
  3. Barto, A. G. (2013). Intrinsic motivation and reinforcement learning(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. In Intrinsically motivated learning in natural and artificial systems (pp. 17-47). Germany: Springer.
  4. Bénabou, R., & Tirole, J. (2002). Self-confidence and personal motivationThe Quarterly Journal of Economics117(3), 871-915.
  5. Berridge, K. C. (2004). Motivation concepts in behavioral neurosciencePhysiology & Behavior81(2), 179-209.
  6. Berridge, K. C., & Kringelbach, M. L. (2013). Neuroscience of affect: brain mechanisms of pleasure and displeasure(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Current Opinion in Neurobiology23(3), 294-303.
  7. Botvinick, M., & Braver, T. (2015). Motivation and cognitive control: from behavior to neural mechanism.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Psychology66(1), 83.
  8. Braver, T. S., Krug, M. K., Chiew, K. S., Kool, W., Westbrook, J. A., Clement, N. J., … & Cools, R. (2014). Mechanisms of motivation–cognition interaction: challenges and opportunities. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience14(2), 443-472.
  9. Burgers, C., Eden, A., van Engelenburg, M. D., & Buningh, S. (2015). How feedback boosts motivation and play in a brain-training game(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Computers in Human Behavior48, 94-103.
  10. Cerasoli, C. P., Nicklin, J. M., & Ford, M. T. (2014). Intrinsic motivation and extrinsic incentives jointly predict performance: A 40-year meta-analysis(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Psychological Bulletin140(4), 980.
  11. Chemolli, E., & Gagné, M. (2014). Evidence against the continuum structure underlying motivation measures derived from self-determination theory.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Psychological Assessment26(2), 575.
  12. Chevallier, C., Kohls, G., Troiani, V., Brodkin, E. S., & Schultz, R. T. (2012). The social motivation theory of autism.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Trends in Cognitive Sciences16(4), 231-239.
  13. Clinkenbeard, P. R. (2012). Motivation and gifted students: implications of theory and research(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Psychology in the Schools49(7), 622-630.
  14. Corr, P. J., DeYoung, C. G., & McNaughton, N. (2013). Motivation and personality: A neuropsychological perspective. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Social and Personality Psychology Compass7(3), 158-175.
  15. Corbit, L. H., & Balleine, B. W. (2015). Learning and motivational processes contributing to Pavlovian–instrumental transfer and their neural bases: dopamine and beyond.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. In Simpson, E.H. and Balsam, P.D. (Eds.), Behavioral Neuroscience of Motivation (pp. 259-289). Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.
  16. Daw, N. D., & Shohamy, D. (2008). The cognitive neuroscience of motivation and learning(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Social Cognition26(5), 593-620.
  17. de Brabander, C. J., & Martens, R. L. (2014). Towards a unified theory of task-specific motivation. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Educational Research Review11, 27-44.
  18. Dweck, C. S., & Leggett, E. L. (1988). A social-cognitive approach to motivation and personality.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Psychological Review95(2), 256.
  19. Kuppens, P., Tuerlinckx, F., Russell, J. A., & Barrett, L. F. (2013). The relation between valence and arousal in subjective experience.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Psychological Bulletin139(4), 917.
  20. Legault, L., & Inzlicht, M. (2013). Self-determination, self-regulation, and the brain: Autonomy improves performance by enhancing neuroaffective responsiveness to self-regulation failure.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology105(1), 123.
  21. Luciana, M., & Collins, P. F. (2012). Incentive motivation, cognitive control, and the adolescent brain: Is it time for a paradigm shift?(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Child Development Perspectives6(4), 392-399.
  22. Luna, B., Paulsen, D. J., Padmanabhan, A., & Geier, C. (2013). The teenage brain cognitive control and motivation.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Current Directions in Psychological Science22(2), 94-100.
  23. McCall, C., & Singer, T. (2012). The animal and human neuroendocrinology of social cognition, motivation and behavior(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Nature neuroscience15(5), 681-688.
  24. Miller, E. M., Shankar, M. U., Knutson, B., & McClure, S. M. (2014).Dissociating motivation from reward in human striatal activity.Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience26(5), 1075-1084.
  25. Nugent, M. (2012). Motivation theories (chapter 5).().43:18 minutes). Available on:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8iVpF81xrYM   (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  26. Proudfit, G. H., Inzlicht, M., & Mennin, D. S. (2013). Anxiety and error monitoring: the importance of motivation and emotion.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  27. Richard, J. M., Castro, D. C., DiFeliceantonio, A. G., Robinson, M. J., & Berridge, K. C. (2013). Mapping brain circuits of reward and motivation: in the footsteps of Ann Kelley(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews37(9), 1919-1931.
  28. Robinson, L. J., Stevens, L. H., Threapleton, C. J., Vainiute, J., McAllister-Williams, R. H., & Gallagher, P. (2012). Effects of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation on attention and memoryActa Psychologica141(2), 243-249.
  29. Robinson, M. J. F., Fischer, A. M., Ahuja, A., Lesser, E. N., & Maniates, H. (2015). Roles of “wanting” and “liking” in motivating behavior: gambling, food, and drug addictions(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. In Simpson, E.H. and Balsam, P.D. (Eds.), Behavioral Neuroscience of Motivation (pp. 105-136). Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.
  30. Russell, C., Li, K., & Malhotra, P. A. (2013). Harnessing motivation to alleviate neglect.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  31. Ryan, R. M. (Ed.). (2012). The Oxford handbook of human motivation. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  32. Schmidt, L., Lebreton, M., Cléry-Melin, M. L., Daunizeau, J., & Pessiglione, M. (2012). Neural mechanisms underlying motivation of mental versus physical effort.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. PLoS Biol10(2), e1001266.
  33. Schunk, D. H. (2012). Chapter 8: Motivation. In Learning theories: an educational perspective (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.(6thEdition) (pp. 345-398). Boston, MA: Pearson.
  34. Spielberg, J. M., Heller, W., & Miller, G. A. (2013). Hierarchical brain networks active in approach and avoidance goal pursuit(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Frontiers in Human Neuroscience7, 284-284.
  35. Tavani, C. M., & Losh, S. C. (2003). Motivation, self-confidence, and expectations as predictors of the academic performances among our high school students.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Child Study Journal33(3), 141-152.
  36. Taormina, R. J., & Gao, J. H. (2013). Maslow and the motivation hierarchy: Measuring satisfaction of the needs.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. The American Journal of Psychology,126(2), 155-177.
  37. University of California Television. (2012). Motivation to pursue dreams and hopes: Understanding the brain’s reward system.. (1:27:09). Available on: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dD-eQ8Poc-k  (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

Other Resources:

  1. Addison, S. (2014). Motivational theories – Maslow, Herzberg & Taylor.. (02:11 minutes). Available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EhVURPcX3L4&feature=youtube_gdata_player  (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

Plasticity

Resources

  1. Alila Medical Media. (2017). Long term potentiation and memory formation, animation.(0:54 to 4:28 minutes). Available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Hm08ksPtMo (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  2. Annenberg Foundation (Producer). (2015). We all have different brains: Brain imaging techniques(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. [multiple videos]. Los Angeles, CA: Author.
  3. Arrowsmith, B. (2013). The woman who changed her brain: Barbara Arrowsmith-Young at TEDxToronto.. (13:56). Available on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0td5aw1KXA&t=9s(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  4. Arrowsmith Program. (2016). Retreived from http://www.arrowsmithschool.org/(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  5. Ansari, D. (2012). Culture and education: new frontiers in brain plasticity.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Trends in Cognitive Sciences16(2), 93-95.
  6. Bach-y-Rita, P. (1990). Brain plasticity as a basis for recovery of function in humans.Neuropsychologia28(6), 547-554.
  7. Bach-y-Rita, P. (2012). [Christine G. producer]. Paul Bach-y-Rita and neuroplasticity.
  8. . (10:39). Available on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7s1VAVcM8s8(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  9. Bashir, S., Vernet, M., Yoo, W. K., Mizrahi, I., Theoret, H., & Pascual-Leone, A. (2012). Changes in cortical plasticity after mild traumatic brain injury.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.  (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience30(4), 277.
  10. Bavelier, D., Levi, D. M., Li, R. W., Dan, Y., & Hensch, T. K. (2010). Removing brakes on adult brain plasticity: from molecular to behavioral interventions(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Journal of Neuroscience30(45), 14964-14971.
  11. Bedny, M., Pascual-Leone, A., Dravida, S., & Saxe, R. (2012). A sensitive period for language in the visual cortex: distinct patterns of plasticity in congenitally versus late blind adults. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Brain and Language122(3), 162-170.
  12. Boivin, M. J., Kakooza, A. M., Warf, B. C., Davidson, L. L., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2015). Reducing neurodevelopmental disorders and disability through research and interventions(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Nature527(7578), S155-S160.
  13. Casey, B.J. (2003). Brain plasticity, learning, and developmental disabilities. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Review, 9(3), 133-134. doi: 10.1002/mrdd.10072
  14. Chang, Y. (2015). Reorganization and plastic changes of the human brain associated with skill learning and expertise. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Neural Implementations of Expertise, 56.
  15. Chen, C. C., Lu, J., & Zuo, Y. (2014). Spatiotemporal dynamics of dendritic spines in the living brain(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Frontiers in Neuroanatomy, 8.
  16. Collerton, D. (2013). Psychotherapy and brain plasticity(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Frontiers in Psychology4.
  17. Cramer, S. C., Sur, M., Dobkin, B. H., O’Brien, C., Sanger, T. D., et al. (2011). Harnessing neuroplasticity for clinical applications.Brain, 134(6), 1591-1609.
  18. Cynader, M. (2013). Enhancing the plasticity of the brain: Max Cynader at TEDxStanleyPark.. (17:22). Available on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Chr3rQ6Vpcw(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  19. Davidson, R. J., & McEwen, B. S. (2012). Social influences on neuroplasticity: stress and interventions to promote well-being(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Nature Neuroscience15(5), 689-695.
  20. Debarnot, U., Sperduti, M., Di Rienzo, F., & Guillot, A. (2014). Experts bodies, experts minds: how physical and mental training shape the brain.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8.
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  22. Dehaene, S., & Cohen, L. (2007). Cultural recycling of cortical maps(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Neuron56(2), 384-398.
  23. Doidge, N. (2007). The brain that changes itself: Stories of personal triumph from the frontiers of brain science(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. (pp. xvii-1) New York, NY: Penguin.
  24. Doidge, N. (2009). Norman Doidge on the brain and neuroplasticity. Available on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFbm3jL7CDI&list=PLGXzCM5c78jRffGwSzMEFxXYGsUCJ6PQ(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  25. Doidge, N. (2015). Interview with Steve Paikin: Norman Doidge, Brain’s healing energies.[TV interview] (28:02). Available on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifYcE4-eI_s  (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  26. Doidge, N. (2015). The brain’s way of healing: remarkable discoveries and recoveries from the frontiers of neuroplasticity. New York, NY: Penguin.
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  29. Duman, R. S. (2002). Pathophysiology of depression: the concept of synaptic plasticity(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.European Psychiatry17, 306-310.
  30. Eriksson, P. S., Perfilieva, E., Björk-Eriksson, T., Alborn, A. M., Nordborg, C., Peterson, D. A., & Gage, F. H. (1998). Neurogenesis in the adult human hippocampus(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Nature Medicine4(11), 1313-1317.
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  32. Feuerstein, R., Falik, L. H., & Feuerstein, R. R. S. (2013). The cognitive elements of neural plasticity(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.The Neuropsychotherapist, 10. Chicago.
  33. Feuerstein, R., Feuerstein, R., & Falik, L. H. (2015). Beyond smarter: Mediated learning and the brain’s capacity for change(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
  34. Fields, R. D. (2015). A new mechanism of nervous system plasticity: activity-dependent myelination.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Nature Reviews Neuroscience16(12), 756-767.
  35. Fishbane, M.D. (2007). Wired to connect: Neuroscience, relationships and therapy.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Family Process, 46, 395. doi: 10.1111/j.1545-5300.2007.00219.x
  36. Fox, S. E., Levitt, P., & Nelson III, C. A. (2010). How the timing and quality of early experiences influence the development of brain architecture(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Child Development81(1), 28-40.
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  38. Galván, A. (2010). Neural plasticity of development and learning.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Human Brain Mapping31(6), 879-890.
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  42. Hermann, D. M., & Chopp, M. (2012). Promoting brain remodelling and plasticity for stroke recovery: therapeutic promise and potential pitfalls of clinical translation.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. The Lancet Neurology11(4), 369-380.
  43. Hertz-Pannier, L., et al. (2002). Late plasticity for language in a child’s non-dominant hemisphere: A pre- and post-surgery fMRI study. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Brain, 125(2), 361.
  44. Ho, D. H., & Burggren, W. W. (2010). Epigenetics and transgenerational transfer: a physiological perspective.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. The Journal of Experimental Biology213(1), 3-16.
  45. Iuculano, T., Rosenberg-Lee, M., Richardson, J., Tenison, C., Fuchs, L., Supekar, K., & Menon, V. (2015). Cognitive tutoring induces widespread neuroplasticity and remediates brain function in children with mathematical learning disabilities(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Nature Communications, 6. 
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  49. Kelly, C., & Castellanos, F. X. (2014). Strengthening connections: functional connectivity and brain plasticity.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Neuropsychology Review24(1), 63-76.
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  52. Kolb, B., & Muhammad, A. (2013). Harnessing the power of neuroplasticity for intervention.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
  53. Kolb, B., Forgie, M., Gibb, R., Gorny, G., & Rowntree, S. (1998). Age, experience, and the changing brain.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews22, 143-159.
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  56. Lebeer, J. (2014). Modifiability and mediated learning in the light of neuroscientific evidence of ecological plasticity(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Erdelyi Pszichologiai Szemle = Transylvanian Journal of Psychology, 51-79.
  57. Lichtmann, J. (n.d.). What is synaptic plasticity?(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. DNA Learning Center. Genes to Cognition Online.
  58. Lillard, A. S. & Erisir, A. (2011). Old dogs learning new tricks: neuroplasticity beyond the juvenile period.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Developmental Review31(4), 207-239.
  59. Lövdén, M., Wenger, E., Mårtensson, J., Lindenberger, U., & Bäckman, L. (2013). Structural brain plasticity in adult learning and development.(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews37(9), 2296-2310.
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